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Congressen en symposia

11 July: Lecture Looking through paintings

In this joint lecture, a data scientist and a technical art historian join forces to get under the skin of the artists to understand how they were combining hand and mind to create those unique depictions we all marvel over.

Novel imaging and scientific analytical techniques provide many new insights in the materials and techniques used by painters in the Dutch Golden Age. Looking through the paint layers with X-rays and Infrared, using digital microscopy at very high magnification and analysing the paints and binding media, has revealed a lot of tricks of the trade painters used to obtain the realism Dutch Golden Age painting is so famous for.

This lecture will be given by Erma Hermens (Senior Researcher Technical Art History, Rijksmuseum and Professor of Studio Practice and Technical Art History, University of Amsterdam) and Robert Erdmann (Senior Scientist, Rijksmuseum and Professor of Conservation Science, University of Amsterdam).
The lecture will be moderated by Andrew Morrall (Professor, Chair of Academic Programmes, Bard Graduate Center).

This exclusive lecture is part of the Summer School Museum Objects as Evidence, collaboratively organised by the Rijksmuseum, the University of Amsterdam and Bard Graduate Center. In this summer programme, students will examine objects from a range of disciplinary perspectives, consider the types of information they generate and unravel the stories they can tell. The Public Lecture is the one moment where everyone – including non-participants of the Summer School – is welcome to come and listen to an inspiring talk about ‘the art of making’.

Following the lecture there will be a drinks reception. One free drink is included with your ticket purchase.
Please note: The lecture will be given in English.

Programme
11 july 2018, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam
Welcome as of 19.00 pm 
Lecture: 19.15-20.30 pm
Drinks and conversation: 20.30-21.30 pm
Tickets>

René Lalique, broche met korenbloemen, ca. 1904, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam.